djibnet.com: In Arab Spring, Indian Labour Warms Up To Djibouti - djibnet.com

Aller au contenu

Page 1 sur 1
  • Vous ne pouvez pas commencer un sujet
  • Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à ce sujet

In Arab Spring, Indian Labour Warms Up To Djibouti Forte immigration de travailleurs Indiens émigrent à Djibouti Noter : -----

#1 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   mehmon Icône

  • Membre
  • Pip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
383
Inscrit :
19-octobre 06

Posté 31 mai 2011 - 12:34

Citation

In Arab spring, Indian labour warms up to Djibouti

Djibouti. Amina Bibi can’t get the pronunciation right. Her husband, over the few conversations they’ve had since his departure six months ago from Dhantala in West Bengal, has corrected her over and over again. She still doesn’t get it right. She doesn’t even know where Djibouti is. “Six hours from Dubai,” she says. That’s where her husband has gone — to build a city in the sand.

Each month, a steady stream of passports lands up on Aden Mohamed Dileita’s desk. Dileita is the First Counsellor at the Embassy of the Republic of Djibouti in India. The embassy does not look anything like UAE’s embassy — there is no metal detector, it’s just a house in New Delhi’s Vasant Vihar where a receptionist sits in what would be the living room and upstairs in one of the bedrooms is Dileita’s office.

President Ismael Omar Guelleh’s picture hangs above his head and his desk is burdened with papers. Each month at least 70 people are applying for a visa, in sharp contrast to just 30 in a year until two years ago.

In fact, as many as 259 visas have been issued since January, more than the total number issued by Djibouti in the previous six years.

The Arab spring and the uncertainty it has set off is making this tiny country in the Horn of Africa — with a population of less than 9,00,000 — increasingly attractive for Indian labour, skilled and unskilled.

Most passports stamped are new passports, their pages, more often than not, blank. For most, Djibouti is their first trip abroad. It takes a maximum of three days to get a visa and visa extensions in Djibouti are increasing. In the past month, 52 visas were processed — all 52 were men and carpenters from across India.

It doesn’t matter whether the labour is skilled or unskilled. It doesn’t matter if the applicant identifies himself through a thumbprint, like Rabiul Mondal from West Bengal did. For now, manpower is needed, to construct something out of African desert-nothingness.

“We’re booming,” says the proud Counsellor. “There are pirates, civil war and malnutrition worries in countries around us but we’re not affected,” he says. It might be a desert with soaring hot temperatures, but Djibouti is an oasis of calm in a volatile region. Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea are its neighbours, while almost next door is Yemen (Osama Bin Laden’s half brother is, in fact, planning to connect the two countries and continents via the world’s largest sea bridge).

Djibouti opened its door to foreign investment in the last decade. At first, it was just aid ships using the Djibouti port to provide food aid to neighbouring Sudan and Ethiopia. Then 9/11 happened and Djibouti’s fate changed. If the mantra ‘location, location, location’ ever meant anything, Djibouti is the encapsulation of it.

First, the Americans came. Djibouti now plays home to the only US Army base in Africa and construction is underway at the American Embassy, says Sheloob Khan, spa manager at the Kempinski Palace in Djibouti. He’s from Kerala.

The number of Indians is increasing, they can be seen working on projects, they even helped build this property in all of six months,” he says.

Indian investment in Djibouti too has just been ramped up further. The Prime Minister announced an extension of $300 million assistance aid for the Ethiopia-Djibouti Railway at the second India-Africa Summit. This line will connect East Africa to trade with Arabia and India

Unlike Dubai, where the recession brought cranes to a standstill, and for a country that cites Dubai as its development-model, business in Djibouti is better than ever. The growth rates sit at a comfortable 8 per cent and have climbed up from 3 per cent in 2003.

But Djibouti has its constraints. The population, like the country, is small, unemployment is high and labour is costly.

However, as unemployment continues to be a fixture at the Al Quoz Labor Camp in Dubai, with unskilled workers not being paid for up to three months, a new opportunity has opened up in Djibouti.

“It’s for the lucky ones, but people are moving from here to Djibouti,” says Nazir Bashir, a labour recruiter at Al Quoz. The Djibouti Embassy in Dubai estimates around 150 Indians acquiring passports for Djibouti. Djibouti’s growth, in fact, has been spurred by Dubai’s companies: the Lootah Group has invested in the country’s airline.

“Change over the past few years has been immense and it’ll keep growing. If it continues at this rate there’ll be a shortage of residences,” says Vinod Shah, Freight Controller at the Indian Honorary Consulate in Djibouti.

It was only last year Djibouti signed a deal with a company to manufacture cement. That too is an Indian company, Saboo Engineers from Jodhpur. S C Joshi, its Vice President, responsible for Djibouti, says the climate is conducive to employment but not many people know “the secret” as yet.

That is clearly changing now. Ask Dileita.


http://www.indianexpress.com/news/in-arab-spring-indian-labour-warms-up-to-djibouti/796727/3source

C'est dommage que tant d'Indiens viennent travailler à Djibouti alors que 59% de notre population active est au chômage...Ces travailleurs sont qualifiés et non-qualifiés, il n'y a aucune reglementation en place chez nous pour controller ces flux migratoire et le gouvernement semble s'en foutre completement.

Vous en pensez quoi?

Discussions sérieuses s'il vous plait. Que ceux qui n'ont rien de constructif à ajouter s'abstiennent, merci.
0

#2 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   Vivedjib Icône

  • Membre
  • Pip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
68
Inscrit :
19-février 11

Posté 31 mai 2011 - 01:35

Voir le messagemehmon, le 31 mai 2011 - 12:34 , dit :

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/in-arab-spring-indian-labour-warms-up-to-djibouti/796727/3source

C'est dommage que tant d'Indiens viennent travailler à Djibouti alors que 59% de notre population active est au chômage...Ces travailleurs sont qualifiés et non-qualifiés, il n'y a aucune reglementation en place chez nous pour controller ces flux migratoire et le gouvernement semble s'en foutre completement.

Vous en pensez quoi?

Discussions sérieuses s'il vous plait. Que ceux qui n'ont rien de constructif à ajouter s'abstiennent, merci.

Vous avez bien signaler que le gouvernement s'en foute complètement.La jeunesse djiboutienne d'aujourd'hui a de quoi faire valoir sur le marché d'emploi à Djibouti.L'indien occupe la place qui devait revenir à un djiboutien former à Djibouti ou ailleur mais en réalité les patrons n'ont pas confiance à la jeunesse djiboutienne en évoquant leur peu ou pas du tout d'expérience ou autres...
C'est un problème réel que le ministre d'emploi, de l'insertion et de la réforme administratif M. Ali Hassan Bahdon doit apporter des solutions.
Quelques pistes des solutions:
Recenser les entreprises susceptibles d'assurer une formation à des jeunes.
Inciter les entreprises en place à former X% des jeunes par ans.Pour cela il faut l'Etat accompagne ces jeunes mais aussi consent un allègement fiscal à ces entreprises.
Obliger les entreprises à se servir d'abord et obligatoirement de la main d'oeuvre locale et ne recourir à ces indiens ou autres qu'exceptionnellement si leur cas ou leurs besoins le justifient.
Je pense que tous ça existe déjà mais il faut vraiment l'appliquer pour que la jeunesse djiboutienne en profite.
0

#3 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   kisaragi Icône

  • Membre
  • Pip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
24
Inscrit :
20-mai 11

Posté 31 mai 2011 - 01:47

Voir le messagemehmon, le 31 mai 2011 - 12:34 , dit :

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/in-arab-spring-indian-labour-warms-up-to-djibouti/796727/3source

C'est dommage que tant d'Indiens viennent travailler à Djibouti alors que 59% de notre population active est au chômage...Ces travailleurs sont qualifiés et non-qualifiés, il n'y a aucune reglementation en place chez nous pour controller ces flux migratoire et le gouvernement semble s'en foutre completement.

Vous en pensez quoi?

Discussions sérieuses s'il vous plait. Que ceux qui n'ont rien de constructif à ajouter s'abstiennent, merci.


afin de lutter contr l chomage l gouvernemen dvrai attire de firm multinational ds ls pays ki biensur embaucheron ds djiboutien, faire disparaitre ls monople afin k cs entrprise puise recruter ls gens selon leur competence e leur kalification e sachan k la population djiboutienne e pour plus de la majorite constitue k ds jeunes il dvrai reduire l age du dpart la retraite a 55ans o minimum kome sa les taux de chomage va diminuer bcp des chose peuven etre realise pour reduire ls chomage a djibouti e sa vrmen tre facilmen e rapidmen mai notr dirigean g pense utilise son cul pour reflechir o lieu de sa tete e sa c decevan ...
0

#4 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   trainer Icône

  • Membre
  • Pip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
123
Inscrit :
15-juillet 10

Posté 01 juin 2011 - 01:52

Voir le messagemehmon, le 31 mai 2011 - 12:34 , dit :

http://www.indianexpress.com/news/in-arab-spring-indian-labour-warms-up-to-djibouti/796727/3source

C'est dommage que tant d'Indiens viennent travailler à Djibouti alors que 59% de notre population active est au chômage...Ces travailleurs sont qualifiés et non-qualifiés, il n'y a aucune reglementation en place chez nous pour controller ces flux migratoire et le gouvernement semble s'en foutre completement.

Vous en pensez quoi?

Discussions sérieuses s'il vous plait. Que ceux qui n'ont rien de constructif à ajouter s'abstiennent, merci.

le vieux postulat de Bourhan Bey qui disait que "Jabouti tahkul cillaha, watarabi cilinaas: Djibouti dévore ses enfants et cajolent les enfants étrangers" se realise tjr, ne soi pas surpris, ceci existe depuis plus d un demi siecle.
0

#5 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   mehmon Icône

  • Membre
  • Pip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
383
Inscrit :
19-octobre 06

Posté 01 juin 2011 - 04:10

Tres bonnes propositions ViveDjib et kisaragi. La mise en place de mécanisme de formation pour assurer une harmonie entre les besoins du marché et les formations dispensés doit etre une priorité. Tout comme une priorité donnée aux Djiboutiens dans l'embauche. J'ais eté choqué de voir des chauffeurs Indiens ou Sri Lankais, on ne va pas me dire qu'il n y a pas de Djiboutiens compétent dans ce sens!

L'idée de réduire l'age à la retraite est bonne aussi à mes yeux. L'age de la retraite actuel est à 65 ans non? Nous sommes un pays ou les moins de 25 ans sont de loin la majorité, il n'y aura aucun probleme a "remplacer" les anciens. D'autant plus que les jeunes aujoud'hui tendent a etre plus formés, plus qualifiés que leur prédecesseurs qui occupent toujours les places.

Mais j'ajouterais aussi un plus grand soutient à la création d'entreprises, surtouts les PME pour qu'elles puissent à leur tours embaucher (pas besion de rapeller qu'il n y a pas de developpement sans un tissu fort de PME). Mais aussi la formalisation des activités informelles (shaar-shaari, ptit business ect...). En formalisant tout ce secteur de l'économie, ces business auront accès à des credits, un support légal et pourrons contribuer a la création d'emplois et de valeur ajoutée...

Merci de garder cette discussion sérieuse tout le monde, n'hésitez pas à contribuer...
0

Partager ce sujet :


Page 1 sur 1
  • Vous ne pouvez pas commencer un sujet
  • Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à ce sujet