djibnet.com: Djibouti Has Been The Darkest Spot Of African Continent - djibnet.com

Aller au contenu

Page 1 sur 1
  • Vous ne pouvez pas commencer un sujet
  • Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à ce sujet

Djibouti Has Been The Darkest Spot Of African Continent Locals and neighbours citizen have been equally terrorized Noter : -----

#1 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 08 mars 2011 - 12:35

According to case filed confidentially in 2009 and made public last week, Djibouti has violated human rights of the neighbouring countries ‘citizen. Not only the international communities are expected Djibouti to apologize it role of illegal US extra-ordinary rendition, but it’s also expected that the regime in Djibouti to financially compensate its victims.

Djibouti has been doing the dirty game of the misguided US foreign policy, by doing so not only the regime terrorized its own citizen in the name of the national security, but the same regime also tolerated the US extra-ordinary rendition of citizen from around the region.

US have been launching military attack from Djibouti to the neighbouring countries like Somalia and Yemen of course with blessing of regime, whether Piggy is capable of paying collateral damages of every US attack originated from Djibouti is another question, but all the victims including locals (Djibouti has yet see one legal case against US military that makes court) may be able to file a law suit against Piggy and State of the heinous crime committed against them.

Djibouti, as sovereign nation, it has a legal obligation to respect regional IGAD, continental AU, and international UN Laws and Treaties. In normal circumstance the regional governments would have contemplating suspension or removal of IGAD head-quarter from Djibouti. IGAD members are also legally obligated to support their citizens that have been tortured in Djibouti, it would have been only possible if we have an elected leaders who have true mandate from their own people.


Citation

Nairobi — Tanzanian authorities enabled the CIA to subject a Dar-based trader to abuse in a secret detention centre in Djibouti and at "black sites" in other countries, human rights attorneys are charging in a case filed with an African Union judicial body.
In the first suit challenging African co-operation with the CIA's secret-prison network, two international law groups contend that Tanzanian police seized their client, Mohammed al-Asad, at his home in Dar es Salaam on the night of December 26, 2003.
Mr Asad was not told why he had been apprehended. He was soon bound and blindfolded and placed on a Tanzair flight to Djibouti, although he was not informed of his destination, the suit states.
The detainee then entered the CIA's "secret detention and torture programme," the law groups maintain.
Mr Asad was held incommunicado in Djibouti for two weeks where he was "interrogated by an American agent and subjected to torture and inhuman treatment," according to the New York-based Centre for Human Rights and Global Justice and London-based Interights.
He was then held for 16 months at a CIA facility in Afghanistan and at a secret location in one other country, the groups say.
Mr Asad was never charged with a crime, nor was he allowed to contact his family or an attorney, according to the filing with the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights.
In 2005, he was transferred to a prison in his native Yemen.
He pleaded guilty the following year to charges of having forged travel documents and was sentenced to time served.
Mr Asad currently lives freely in Yemen with his Tanzanian wife. The legal filing asks the African Commission to rule that Djibouti violated Mr Asad's human rights and to specify compensation due him.
The case was confidentially filed in 2009 and made public last week.
"By serving as the doorway for the US secret detention and rendition programme in Africa, Djibouti directly violated the human rights of our client," says Jayne Huckerby, research director for the New York University human rights law centre.
She adds that the Gambia-based African Commission has "an historic opportunity to not only stand up for African sovereignty and human rights, but also to provide long-overdue truth and justice to an individual who was illegally abducted, detained and tortured in the name of state security."
Mr Asad, now 51, says in a filing with the African Commission that he visited his father and uncle in Tanzania in the early 1980s and moved there from Yemen in 1985 "Because the communist government in power in Yemen at the time had strict policies regarding travel permits, I had to be smuggled out of Yemen by car and then travelled onwards using my Yemeni passport," he states. "I obtained a fraudulent Tanzanian birth certificate and passport in order to be able to make a living and own land in Tanzania."
Mr Asad says he became a successful and respected businessman during this 18 years in Dar es Salaam, where he owned property.
"At the time I was disappeared, my business was doing quite well. Besides owning the building, I also owned land in Mtwara and had been granted permission to start a new business," he tells the African Commission.
His Al-Asad Trading Company rented space in the Dar building to the Saudi-based Al-Haramain Islamic Foundation.
"That may have been the reason I was secretly detained," Mr Asad suggests in the filing with the African Commission.
Al-Haramain's branches in Tanzania, Kenya, Pakistan and Indonesia were designated by the United States in 2004 as organisations engaged in or supporting terrorism.
"I believed that by renting office space to the Foundation, I was helping a charitable organisation," Mr Asad tells the African Commission. "If the Al-Haramain Islamic Foundation engaged in other types of activities, they were kept secret from me and I was not aware of them."
The government of Tanzania has declared that Mr Asad was deported as an illegal immigrant under the Immigration Act of 1995.
It was not until June 2004 -- six months after his deportation -- that Tanzanian authorities revealed that Mr Asad had been sent to Djibouti.
The admission came in response to a writ of habeas corpus filed by Mr Asad's father with the High Court of Tanzania.
Kenya has also sent detainees to secret sites in Djibouti, according to the United Nations Human Rights Council.
The UN group has reported on the case of a Somali who was handed over to the CIA in Kenya and then flown, blindfolded and shackled, to Djibouti.
A second detainee was also transferred from Kenya to Djibouti as part of the US rendition and secret detention programme, the UN has said.
Djibouti has become an important ally of the United States in the years following the 2001 attacks on New York and Washington.
In the five years after September 11, 2001, Djibouti received 40 times the amount of military aid it had been given by the US in the five years prior to the twin terror attacks.
"My life and that of my family have been unjustly ruined and no one has been held accountable," Mr Asad said recently. "It is my sincere hope that the African Commission will finally allow me to receive a measure of justice for what was taken from me."
The CIA declines to comment on the specifics of Mr Asad's case.
But an agency spokesman told The Washington Post last week that "much of what has been alleged about the former CIA detention and interrogation programme, which ended over two years ago, is simply incorrect."

Ce message a été modifié par labo22 - 08 mars 2011 - 12:36 .

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
1

#2 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 09 mars 2011 - 02:39

The following is what the UN, North America and South America representative of regime Roble Olhaye has to say about the allegation, the first of its kind.

Citation

We are stunned by the assertion that Djibouti has been a "partner" with the CIA in the torture of an innocent victim in a secret "black site" prison in Djibouti. My country has never played a part in the so-called CIA rendition and detention program. Those who are putting unvarnished trust in the victim's memories by filing a legal case against my country, and urging it to "answer for abuses it committed as part of the CIA's secret program," are trading sound judicial inquiry for heresy and publicity.

How can the victim's unreliable account that "one guard told him he was in Djibouti," that "he noticed a photograph of the country's president on a wall in the prison" and that later on "Tanzanian authorities told his father that he had been taken to Djibouti" be the key evidence of the case against Djibouti? Why would my president's photograph hang in a prison cell, of all places?

Djibouti deplores torture and inhuman treatment of all people and cannot accept the denigration of its integrity on uncorroborated charges.

Roble Olhaye, New York


According to Wiki leaks, Roble Olhaye arranged the initial rendezvous with BLACK WATER inside the Djiboutian Embassy in Washington DC, and paves the way that Black Water terrorist security firm to operate in Djibouti with impunity from local and international laws.

http://www.washingto...1022803848.html
Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
1

#3 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 14 mars 2011 - 12:28

The following is what Aden Houssein Abdillahi Ambassador/Permanent Representative of Djibouti to Kenya has to about the case before the African Human Right commission, as if the CIA clandestine mission needs a commercial airline to transport their kidnapped victims through transnational borders from around the world.

Citation

The statement that the victim “was blindfolded and placed on a Tanzair flight to Djibouti” is erroneous since there are no flight connections operating from Tanzania to Djibouti.
This story was in fact discredited a long time ago due to lack of sufficient evidence to support it.


full story please click the following link;

http://www.theeastaf...jz/-/index.html

Ce message a été modifié par labo22 - 14 mars 2011 - 12:29 .

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#4 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 17 mars 2011 - 05:47

al-Asad v Djibouti
Area Africa
Date 28th February 2011
Programme Africa Security and the Rule of Law
Keywords Liberty and Security
Torture Movement


African Commission Urged to Take on Groundbreaking Extraordinary Rendition Case

Case against Djibouti is First to Challenge African Cooperation in CIA Secret Detention Program

(New York and London, February 28, 2011)–The African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights should require Djibouti to answer for abuses it committed as part of the CIA’s secret detention and rendition program, said the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ) at NYU School of Law and the international human rights law organization, INTERIGHTS in a legal filing today. The two organizations urged the African Commission to officially accept the first-ever international case exposing an African country’s role in the U.S. rendition, secret detention, and torture program. The case—made public today—was confidentially filed in December 2009 on behalf of their client, Mohammed al-Asad, a Yemeni national who was detained in Djibouti in December 2003 and January 2004 as part of the CIA’s secret detention and rendition program. In addition to secretly detaining al-Asad, Djibouti was responsible for transferring him into the “black site” prison program, where he spent some sixteen months in secret and incommunicado detention. In May 2005, al-Asad was transferred to Yemen, where he resides freely today.

The African Commission took preliminary steps to accept the case, al-Asad v. Djibouti, in November 2010, notifying the parties that it was seized of the matter. Today’s filing marks the first public notice of the case and urges the Commission to find the case admissible, a step that would require Djibouti to reply to the allegations made by al-Asad.

By serving as the doorway for the U.S. secret detention and rendition program in Africa, Djibouti directly violated the human rights of our client,” said CHRGJ Research Director, Jayne Huckerby. “Today the African Commission faces an historic opportunity to not only stand up for African sovereignty and human rights, but also to provide long-overdue truth and justice to an individual who was illegally abducted, detained, and tortured in the name of state security.”

In late 2003, al-Asad was expelled from Tanzania, where he had lived for more than a decade, and flown to Djibouti—a country wholly unfamiliar to him—where he was detained in a secret Djiboutian prison, interrogated by an American agent, and subjected to torture and inhuman treatment for approximately two weeks. Al-Asad was then taken to an airport where he encountered a “rendition team”—a gang of black-clad individuals who stripped and assaulted him before chaining, hooding, and forcing him onto a small airplane that launched al-Asad into a network of secret CIA prisons in Afghanistan and Eastern Europe. He endured further abuse in CIA custody for more than a year before being returned to Yemen in 2005. Al-Asad was released in 2006, never having been charged with a terrorism-related offense.

“I will never be able to return to my life before detention,” said Mr. al-Asad by phone from Yemen, where he currently resides. “My life and that of my family have been unjustly ruined and no one has been held accountable. It is my sincere hope that the African Commission will finally allow me to receive a measure of justice for what was taken from me.”

Despite extensive evidence—including an exhaustive U.N. report on secret detention in February 2010 that includes al-Asad’s case—neither the U.S. government nor the government of Djibouti have even acknowledged al-Asad’s detention. As al-Asad’s entryway into the secret detention and program, Djibouti played an especially crucial role in his abuse.

The cooperation of countries all over the world—including Djibouti in the Horn of Africa—was central to the operation of the U.S. rendition, secret detention, and torture program. While the role of European partners such as Poland and Romania has been the subject of much reporting and investigation, the assistance of countries like Djibouti has yet to be scrutinized.

“Human rights apply to everyone and cannot simply be bargained away through secret agreements among governments,” said Margaret Satterthwaite, Faculty Director of the CHRGJ. “We urge the African Commission to make clear that this blatant disregard for justice on the continent is not acceptable. As calls for justice and democracy sweep across Northern Africa, the time is ripe for the Commission to ensure that governments in the region end their complicity in human rights violations carried out in the name of state security.”

In response to today’s filing, the government of Djibouti will be asked to lodge a formal reply. The Commission will then determine whether the case meets the Commission’s technical requirements for admissibility. Such a finding will allow the case to proceed to a full hearing on the merits.

“This case is the first filed before the African Commission on rendition in Africa, but it is far from an isolated case,” said Solomon Sacco, an INTERIGHTS lawyer working on the case. “Evidence continues to emerge of a systematic global practice of rendition. This case is part of a growing demand for recognition and justice for victims of rendition that will not go away. States—like Djibouti— who cooperated with the United States in its rendition programs, violating their own laws as well as the African Charter in the process, must be held accountable by the African Commission. ”

Background

The African Commission hears cases that allege that a country party to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights violated the rights protected by that Charter. If the Commission decides to hear this case on the merits, it will have an opportunity to rule that Djibouti violated al-Asad’s human rights and to specify that Djibouti compensate al-Asad for the harm he has suffered.

To read the complaint in al-Asad’s case, click here. To read today’s admissibility briefing, click here. To read al-Asad’s declaration, click here. For other supporting evidence, click here.

For more information on CHRGJ’s work on protecting the rights of people abused in the context of the U.S. counter-terrorism measures, click here. For more information on INTERIGHTS’ work, click here.

Contacts:

Veerle Opgenhaffen, Senior Program Director, CHRGJ
opgenhaffen@exchange.law.nyu.edu/ 917-526-1972

Solomon Sacco, Lawyer INTERIGHTS
ssacco@interights.org / + 44 20 7843 0473

Helen Duffy, Litigation Director, INTERIGHTS
hduffy@interights.org / + 00 31 70 3459 777

Ce message a été modifié par labo22 - 17 mars 2011 - 05:48 .

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#5 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 05 septembre 2011 - 11:12

Image IPB
The US government used the same aircraft – tail number N85VM, owned by Liverpool FC owner Philip Morse see in Djibouti

Torture Update

September 1, 2011

Two aviation companies that were involved in the U.S. government's "extraordinary rendition" program are squabbling in court over $874,000. Result? Juicy court filings:

The private business jets shuttled among as many as 10 landings over a single mission, costing the government as much as $300,000 per flight.

Jets were dispatched to Islamabad; Rome, Italy; Djibouti, Djibouti; Frankfurt, Germany; Dubai, United Arab Emirates; Shannon, Ireland; Glasgow, Scotland; Tenerife, Spain; Sharm el Sheik, Egypt; and even Tripoli.

Some flights landed at airports near where CIA black sites operated — Kabul, Bangkok and Bucharest. Others touched down at foreign outposts where obliging security services reportedly took in U.S. terror detainees for their own severe brand of persuasion — Cairo; Damascus, Syria; Amman, Jordan; and Rabat, Morocco.

Ce message a été modifié par labo22 - 05 septembre 2011 - 11:25 .

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#6 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 09 décembre 2014 - 07:23

Yemeni man hopes landmark torture report will prompt long-awaited apology

Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad wants an apology from Djibouti, which is believed to have handed him to the US for CIA rendition

CIA braced for impact of torture report’s publication

As the Obama administration, the CIA and a Senate committee prepare to release a landmark torture inquiry, a Yemeni hotelier’s reputation hangs in the balance of one of the lines within it that may never be released.

Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad spent nearly a year and a half inside undisclosed CIA prisons before an unceremonious release in 2005. Nearly a decade later, he wants an apology from the country that handed him to the United States. Unless it is publicly named in the Senate intelligence committee’s report into CIA torture, expected for partial release as early as Tuesday, he may never get it.

Asad believes Djibouti, a major US counter-terrorism ally, is responsible for his ordeal, citing flight records, international investigations and even an earthquake. Djibouti fervently denies any role in the affair. Asad’s attorneys last week asked the quasi-judicial African Commission on Human and People’s Rights to reverse its decision this summer to dismiss his case.

That appeal, they believe, will turn on the report. As originally written, the document reportedly confirms Djibouti’s involvement. But the public version of the report may keep that involvement hidden behind black ink.

“If we has had the [Senate] report unredacted, we would have a slam-dunk case. I think it’s a real travesty that we don’t have that,” said Meg Satterthwaite, a law professor and director of New York University’s Global Justice Clinic who represents Asad.

Asad is not looking to see his name in the high-profile report, only a reference to Djibouti as a participant in the CIA’s Bush-era “rendition, detention and interrogation” program. A 2010 UN report on secret detentions cited Djibouti’s involvement with the infamous CIA effort. Journalist Jason Leopold, citing US officials, reported that the Senate report identified Djibouti as hosting CIA “black-site” unacknowledged prisons.

Months of tussle over so-called “redactions” – the voluminous portions of the report that the CIA has worked to censor from public release – have made the transparency issue seem impersonal, bureaucratic or abstract. For Asad, it has real, human consequences.

Asad’s ordeal began in December 2003, when he was living in Tanzania, where he ran a tire trading company in Dar es Salaam. There, he had long rented space in a building he owned to men from the al-Haramain Foundation, which the US Treasury Department would designate as connected to terrorism a decade later, and served as a local trustee. Asad would later tell the African commission that all he knew of the group was its charitable work, and he hoped his association with it would “enhance my social standing”.

On 26 December 2003, Tanzanian police accosted Asad at his home. Instead of arresting or charging him, they drove him to an unfamiliar apartment for an hours-long interrogation, and then took him to an airport, where a plane would take him on a pre-dawn flight to a country he believes is Djibouti.

Critically, Asad cannot cite direct confirmation that he was in Djibouti. He was blindfolded, and his interrogators were less than forthcoming about his location.

Yet a habeas corpus petition later filed by al-Asad’s father identified his flight’s destination as Djibouti, and a UN report from 2010 states it flatly. A prison guard told Asad the same; and a photograph on the wall showed Ismaïl Omar Guelleh, Djibouti’s president. Asad’s legal team even traced his recollections of what he thought was an earthquake to a contemporaneous 5.0 tremor that shook the country’s capitol.

In what he believes to be Djibouti, Asad was confined to a concrete cell which he would only leave for interrogation sessions. One of his interrogators was a white woman who “identified herself as an American”, but without specifying which branch of the US government employed her. Most questions concerned Haramain. At times interrogators told Asad he would only be detained a few days. But on one occasion, he recalled in his commission filing, the American woman’s interpreter grew angry and told him that his children would soon be orphans.

Yet Asad would only spend about two weeks in Djibouti. Early in January 2004, guards blindfolded and restrained him, to take him once again to an airfield. But instead of returning him to his family in Tanzania, they stripped, diapered, hooded and chained him, put him in a jumpsuit and placed him on a plane to the first of what he estimates are four secret prisons, two of which Satterthwaite believes were CIA black sites in Afghanistan. He would remain in them until May 2005.

Asad told the commission he was “horribly abused” in US captivity. His account is consistent with others given by people held at US black sites: Asad says he was kept in isolation in cold cells and subjected to “horribly loud, constant, thumping music, 24 hours a day” in the second of his US prisons. Despite the treatment, Satterthwaite said, people identifying themselves as US officials visited him and said he was “at the top of our list” of detainees to release.

After 16 months, US officials sent Asad to Yemeni custody, without explaining what he was supposed to have done wrong. He eventually pleaded guilty to forging travel documents and was set free in March 2006. Reunited with his family, Asad now runs a hotel in rural Yemen. He has spent years seeking to compel Djibouti to acknowledge and apologize for its role in his detention, which it denies.

“He provided no proof that he was ever in Djibouti. He provided no proof that any Djiboutian officials knew about his situation or participated in any of the treatment he alleges that he suffered. I think his real claim is against the United States,” said Paul Reichler, a Washington DC lawyer who represented Djibouti before the African commission.

Djibouti is among America’s most important counter-terrorism partners in Africa. Since 2003, a refurbished base, Camp Lemonnier, has served as a launch pad for drone strikes, special operations raids and other military missions; in May, the Obama administration signed a 20-year lease on the facility. Satterthwaite believes that Djibouti offered up Asad to the US to curry favor with its new, powerful patron.

Satterthwaite acknowledged the difficulties of Asad’s appeal. Should he prevail, the commission itself is powerless to compel Djibouti to apologize, as it can merely recommend that outcome.

The task is magnified by the looming censorship. The CIA has strenuously resisted identifying its rendition partners, much as it has rejected public identification of its own agents involved in torture. Should the public excerpts of the Senate torture report not identify Djibouti, Asad’s legal team will have no choice but to “forensically try to piece together” the evidence of his rendition once more, she said.

“There are innocent victims of the program. We all know that. They’re still out there. They deserve to have the truth told about their cases, and they deserve some form of apology. I think if the report were made public without all of the redactions, that in itself would be an enormous piece of justice for people whose lives were turned upside down by this program,” Satterthwaite said.
Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#7 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 14 décembre 2014 - 11:53

Djibouti's Ambassador to the U.S., Roble Olhaye, told Al Jazeera his country was not a "knowing participant" in the CIA's rendition program and he rejected claims by al-Asad that he was temporarily imprisoned there.

However, Olhaye said, "If something was done in the context of the American base there how we would know?" But, he said, Djibouti's agreement with the U.S. precluded the base from being used to house prisoners.

Olhaye called al-Asad a "liar", adding, "Everything about his case relies on hearsay and conjecture. There were no flights that came to Djibouti on that day he said he was brought to my country from Tanzania. That was checked by our lawyers."

But John Sifton, the Asia advocacy director at Human Rights Watch, who has spent more than a decade investigating the CIA's rendition, detention and interrogation program testified before the commission last year and said "the fact that the flight records of CIA aircraft that are public do not include a flight that matches Mr. al-Asad's trajectory is not indicative of anything in and of itself."

Sifton said the CIA could "easily circumvent data collection" and "aircraft used by the CIA could easily be rendered untraceable while flying in and around Djibouti."

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#8 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 30 janvier 2016 - 03:00

The Collective for Solidarity with Social and Political Struggle in Africa, which has provided electoral assistance in Africa since 2009, accused the Guelleh regime of electoral fraud throughout his rule.

“International actors, especially those countries with a military base or who are partners in development, are once again challenged by the need to affirm strong support for democratisation in Africa and to act to prevent a shutdown of democracy in Djibouti,” the Collective said.

If the above mentioned countries have been partners of Human Right abuses as the following Affidavit demonstrate in conjunction with communication No 383/2010 in the matter between Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad and Republic of Djibouti.

We have to ask ourselves the logical obvious question, would they have a moral authority to lecture Piggy? The only remaining active participants of Djibnet forum Elmi and T---gals’ opinion are greatly are welcome.

Mon lienMon lien
Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#9 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 30 janvier 2016 - 03:04

Voir le messagelabo22, le 30 January 2016 - 03:00 AM, dit :

The Collective for Solidarity with Social and Political Struggle in Africa, which has provided electoral assistance in Africa since 2009, accused the Guelleh regime of electoral fraud throughout his rule.

“International actors, especially those countries with a military base or who are partners in development, are once again challenged by the need to affirm strong support for democratisation in Africa and to act to prevent a shutdown of democracy in Djibouti,” the Collective said.

If the above mentioned countries have been partners of Human Right abuses as the following Affidavit demonstrate in conjunction with communication No 383/2010 in the matter between Mohammed Abdullah Saleh al-Asad and Republic of Djibouti.

We have to ask ourselves the logical obvious question, would they have a moral authority to lecture Piggy? The only remaining active participants of Djibnet forum Elmi and T---gals’ opinions are greatly are welcome.

Mon lienMon lien

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

#10 L'utilisateur est hors-ligne   labo22 Icône

  • Membre Avancé
  • PipPip
Groupe :
Membres
Messages :
1 456
Inscrit :
21-décembre 09
Gender:
Male

Posté 10 février 2016 - 12:49

Mon lien
Click here to listen

Ce message a été modifié par labo22 - 10 février 2016 - 12:56 .

Suppression of Free Speech

Djibnet created online GABOOD or Sheraton hotel Djibouti with Ahmed Bouh its gate keeper, just in case no one has noticed!! Why I can NOT post anything IS ? mark!!!

labo222@googlemail.com
0

Partager ce sujet :


Page 1 sur 1
  • Vous ne pouvez pas commencer un sujet
  • Vous ne pouvez pas répondre à ce sujet